Category Archives: Tips & Advice

Eliminate security risks with MSL’s Flint Shredders

Eliminate security risks with MSL's Flint Shredders

Eliminate security risks with MSL’s Flint Shredders

As spring inches closer and closer, we wanted to share a few interesting facts and tips on shredding to help get you ready for some good spring cleaning!

Did You Know: According to a 1988 Supreme Court Ruling (California vs. Greenwood), when a person throws something out, that item is now the public domain. Any piece of material may be taken without permission.
  • Tip: Use shredded paper in your compost pile.
  • Tip: Donate shredded paper to animal shelters.
  • Did You Know: Approximately 1 bag of cross cut paper shreds equals 5 bags of straight cut paper shreds.

Security and liability are concerns for every business owner. Eliminate risk with MSL’s Flint Shredders’ line of commercial paper shredders and hard drive shredding machines. We carry a wide model range and variety of paper shredders. Contact us for additional information or CLICK HERE to check out our models.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
Flint Shredders

5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net
www.flintshredders.com

Knife Care Tips from Challenge Machinery

challenge-paper-cutter-knife_12

Knife Care Tips from Challenge Machinery

KNIFE SAFETY ! Knives are DANGEROUS!!! They are heavy and very sharp, even after use. Keep the edge away from your body and keep the area clear of others when handling knives. Never touch the cutting edge! To prevent personal injury and damage to the knife, always keep knives in their holders with screws tightened. You are aware of the dangers, but others may not be. Never attempt to hone, polish, or service the knife in any way. Failure to follow safety procedures may result in severe lacerations or dismemberment.

Knife Blade Life

Knife blade life, or the time between sharpenings, can be affected by many factors. One important factor is the type of paper being cut. Abrasive paper, such as recycled paper, soft paper such as newsprint paper, and bound books can all significantly shorten knife blade life. Also, if the knife depth is set too deep, the knife will cut too deep into the cutting stick and can dull the knife blade.

A knife can last anywhere between 2,000 and 5,000 cuts before it needs to be sharpened. Cutting soft paper (such as newsprint paper) or paper with high post-consumer recycled content can cause the knife to need sharpening after only 2,000 to 3,000 cuts. Cutting pure paper, such as bond paper with no recycled content, or hard paper can allow the knife to be used for as many as 5,000 cuts before it needs to be sharpened. In all cases, the operator should continually check the quality of the cut to determine when the knife blade needs to be sharpened. Some characteristics that indicate a blade needs sharpening are:

  • The knife hesitates or stalls while making a cut.
  • The sheets are not all cut to the same length (usually the top few sheets are longer than the rest of the sheets – this is sometimes called “draw”).
  • Cut marks appear on the cut face of the paper.
  • The profile of the cut (side view) is not perpendicular to the table.
  • The cut does not appear straight when viewed from the top.
  • The knife makes a “rougher” sound as it passes through paper.
  • Nicks are visible on the cutting edge of the knife.

Cutting Stick

A worn cutting stick can affect the cut quality of the bottom sheets. When this happens, the cut stick can be rotated. Usually, the stick should be rotated one or two times between knife sharpenings.

There are 8 possible cut stick positions. The stick can be rotated 4 times, and then turned end to end, and rotated 4 times again.

Bevel Angle

Challenge recommends that bevel angles for knives be in the range of 21° to 23°. In general, a 21° bevel angle will provide better cut quality when cutting soft paper (such as newsprint), recycled paper, or bound books. However, 21° angle knives can become dull sooner than 23° knives, which results in shorter knife blade life. A knife with a 23° bevel angle, on the other hand, will not dull as easily, and can provide satisfactory results when cutting most types of paper.

Helpful Suggestions

It may be beneficial to purchase more than one set of knives: one set beveled at 21° and the other at 23°. Note: A set consists of 3 knives: one in the machine, one as a back up, and one at the grinder.

If the machine seems to strain but the cut quality is still good, reduce the pile height. You may also carefully apply glycerin to the bevel when cutting hard, coated paper. Tie a cloth to the end of a stick; dip the stick in glycerin, and apply. Never apply by hand! In lieu of glycerin you may lightly rub white bar soap along the bevel. Lubrication will prolong the life of your machine and reduce maintenance.

Knife Care

  • To prevent corrosion, knives are coated with light oil. It should be REMOVED WITH CARE.
  • While removing or installing a knife, be careful not to allow the edge to bump against the machine. Nicks will result.
  • If a knife bolt is damaged, replace it. Always keep knife bolts securely tightened. Always use the heavy-duty knife bolt washers provided by Challenge. Failure to do so could result in scratching or marring of the clamp face. Store knives in a dry environment to prevent corrosion. Never attempt to service a knife in any way.

Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Baum Static Reduction Options

We’re coming up on the dry season which means more static. Baumfolder has many weapons to use in the fight against static build up which often starts with your paper and only gets worse when put through today’s modern digital presses. Often one has to employ many lines of defense with this age old enemy. Take a look at some of the offerings we have below. And as always, please contact us if you have any questions.

Baum 714XLT Static Reducer Kit

Static String KitThe Baum 714XLT Static Reducer Kit is mounted on the exit end of the folder to reduce any static charge buildup during the folding process. The Static Reducer’s special design utilizes heavy-duty magnets with a newly developed conductive cord that draws the static charge from the paper. The kit can be added to all Baum 714 tabletop folders, both old and new, for the Baum 714XLT Air Feed, 714XE Friction Feed and Ultrafold models. The part number for the 714XLT folder kit is FK2002081.

There is no drilling needed to mount this kit to the folder. You simply place it as shown in the photos below using the magnets to hold it in place.

Static Dissipation Bars

Static BarsConsists of two static bars and a power unit (115V / 60Hz). Neutralizes the electric charges by creating an ionization field around the two bars. Part number dependent upon machine. Contact us for additional information.


Static Tinsil, an old standby that still works well as well as the Ionix Tube.


For more information on Baum tabletop folding Static Reducer Kits, contact us at 1-800-343-4231.
Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

How to Check Your Roll Condition on Your Folder

How to Check Your Roll Condition on Your Folder

The fold rolls in your Baumfolder are the heart and muscle of your folding operation. Make sure these valuable investments are still able to give you the quality work your customer demand. This simple procedure can let you verify the condition of your rolls which will give you confidence on that next job.

To Check This Operation – Lock out the power supply to the folder so it can’t be started up while you have your hand in the folder.

As you use your folder for a length of time, the ink from the printing can build up and cause the rollers to become slick and to lose their grip. If you begin to have trouble holding a fold, raise the fold plate with the folder power locked off and the fold plate secure so it does not fall on your hand. Check the urethane section of the fold rollers to determine if this has happened. Use SURE WASH and clean the fold rollers. This difficulty to clean the rollers depends on the amount of ink on the rollers.

To check for wear, with power locked out so no one can start the folder, remove the fold plates. Insert several single strips of paper rolled by hand into the roll in a forward direction about half way. Have a single strip of the same paper in the Baum sets. Now pull on each strip of paper, (don’t pull all the way out). You should have the same tension on all the strips. There may be a very slight difference and still be OK. Put the fold plates back in their proper location.

Also, check for gouges or nicks created by severe jam-ups or using screw drivers to remove jams.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Challenge Machinery Paper Drilling Tips

category_header_challenge

Important! To prevent the drill from overheating, always avoid drilling too slowly. The table should be brought up as rapidly as possible allowing the drills to easily cut through the paper. Also, adjust the vertical table guide to return the table to the down position as rapidly as possible to avoid spinning the drills in the stock.

Slotted Holes – Instead of punching slotted holes for five and seven hole universal binding work, save time and cost by drilling a 1/2 inch diameter hole in place of the slot. The slot is only intended to allow the post or ring to be used in either location, and the large hole permits this.

Plastic Bindings – Drilling holes for plastic bindings, instead of punching them, is practical and saves a great deal of time, particularly on long run jobs.

Keep Drills Sharp – A dull drill is the major cause of drill breakage and production tie-ups. Usually after three hours of drilling, depending on the type of paper being processed, the drill should be sharpened. A dull drill results in poor quality work.

Keep Drills Clean – A dirty and rusty drill will not permit the free upward passage of the drill chips. Pressure built up by a clogged drill will split or break the drill. To keep it free from dirt or rust, clean the drill of all chips after each use and apply a light oil to the inside and outside. Drills should be cleaned out immediately after each use. This is particularly true if a coated or varnished stock has been drilled. On these jobs the coating on the chips frequently fuse the chips into one solid mass when the drill cools, causing breakage the next time the drill is used.

Lubricate Drills – Lubrication assists in the passage of the chips and helps avoid overheating of the drills. Use readily available stick lubricants for this purpose. Hold the end of the stick against the side of the rotating drill. Be sure to touch the cutting edge with the lubricant also. Wipe off excess oil before drilling. CARE MUST ALWAYS BE TAKEN WHEN HANDLING DRILLS.

Keep Spindle Clean – Clean out the drill spindle frequently. This will prevent any buildup in the spindle of the drill.

Set the Drills Correctly – Do not cut too deeply into the cutting block. The drill should just touch the block and cleanly cut through the bottom sheet. During drilling, do not set the drill deeper into the block but change the position of the block frequently. Drilling deeper into the block dulls the drills quickly. Use a piece of chipboard underneath your stock. This will make handling the stock easier and will ensure that the last sheet is cut cleanly through.

Check for Drill Wobble – If spindles are badly worn or bent through misadjustment, have them replaced immediately. A wobbly or loosely held drill will break.

Check Your Drill Sharpener – The cutting edge of the sharpening bit should be inspected frequently to make certain that it is sharp and free of nicks. Never let a drill drop onto the sharpening bit. It will chip the sharpening edge. Use gentle pressure when sharpening – let the sharpening bit do the work. Check the sharpness of the drill after sharpening. The cutting edge should be razor sharp.

Just a little time and effort taken with each use of your paper drilling machine should result in trouble free operation over many years.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Challenge Machinery Paper Drilling Tips

category_header_challenge

Important! To prevent the drill from overheating, always avoid drilling too slowly. The table should be brought up as rapidly as possible allowing the drills to easily cut through the paper. Also, adjust the vertical table guide to return the table to the down position as rapidly as possible to avoid spinning the drills in the stock.

Slotted Holes – Instead of punching slotted holes for five and seven hole universal binding work, save time and cost by drilling a 1/2 inch diameter hole in place of the slot. The slot is only intended to allow the post or ring to be used in either location, and the large hole permits this.

Plastic Bindings – Drilling holes for plastic bindings, instead of punching them, is practical and saves a great deal of time, particularly on long run jobs.

Keep Drills Sharp – A dull drill is the major cause of drill breakage and production tie-ups. Usually after three hours of drilling, depending on the type of paper being processed, the drill should be sharpened. A dull drill results in poor quality work.

Keep Drills Clean – A dirty and rusty drill will not permit the free upward passage of the drill chips. Pressure built up by a clogged drill will split or break the drill. To keep it free from dirt or rust, clean the drill of all chips after each use and apply a light oil to the inside and outside. Drills should be cleaned out immediately after each use. This is particularly true if a coated or varnished stock has been drilled. On these jobs the coating on the chips frequently fuse the chips into one solid mass when the drill cools, causing breakage the next time the drill is used.

Lubricate Drills – Lubrication assists in the passage of the chips and helps avoid overheating of the drills. Use readily available stick lubricants for this purpose. Hold the end of the stick against the side of the rotating drill. Be sure to touch the cutting edge with the lubricant also. Wipe off excess oil before drilling. CARE MUST ALWAYS BE TAKEN WHEN HANDLING DRILLS.

Keep Spindle Clean – Clean out the drill spindle frequently. This will prevent any buildup in the spindle of the drill.

Set the Drills Correctly – Do not cut too deeply into the cutting block. The drill should just touch the block and cleanly cut through the bottom sheet. During drilling, do not set the drill deeper into the block but change the position of the block frequently. Drilling deeper into the block dulls the drills quickly. Use a piece of chipboard underneath your stock. This will make handling the stock easier and will ensure that the last sheet is cut cleanly through.

Check for Drill Wobble – If spindles are badly worn or bent through misadjustment, have them replaced immediately. A wobbly or loosely held drill will break.

Check Your Drill Sharpener – The cutting edge of the sharpening bit should be inspected frequently to make certain that it is sharp and free of nicks. Never let a drill drop onto the sharpening bit. It will chip the sharpening edge. Use gentle pressure when sharpening – let the sharpening bit do the work. Check the sharpness of the drill after sharpening. The cutting edge should be razor sharp.

Just a little time and effort taken with each use of your paper drilling machine should result in trouble free operation over many years.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Soft Paper Cutting Demonstration Video by Challenge

Soft Paper Cutting Demonstration Video by Challenge

Soft Paper Cutting Demonstration Video by Challenge

Watch the material ‘lift’ when under clamping force and you can see the same thing happening to the material in front of the knife. There are several things that you can do to help minimize the lifting.

First, you reduce the pile size. In this video example, they are using a 3″ pile of very thin, flimsy paper (phone book-like). They recommend under 2″ (as a starting point).

Secondly, set the backgauge to fixed dimension in this case, it is set to 1-1/2″.

Reduce the clamping pressure to the minimum setting and cut your strips one at a time  and set them aside. Doing this maintains a solid surface that is completely holding flat virtually all of the material while cutting.

Now you can reposition the backgauge (if necessary) to the next dimension. In this case, they left it at 1-1/2″. If you watch closely you can see that the paper is not firmly held flat.

Following these suggestions should help increase your final product quality.

Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Micro-Perf Finishing for Table Top & Folder Models

Micro-perf is special, very fine perforation that tears clean when pulled apart. This perforation is used for stocks that need perforations and must be fed again through copiers and printers.

There are kits available for both 7/8” and 1-1/8” shaft sizes. The key to whether your machine can utilize a micro-perf is dependent upon if your machine has adjustable slitter shafts. The adjustment occurs in the center to center distance between the shafts. Because the micro-perf crushes the paper between a blade and a hardened metal ring, a fine adjustment is necessary to prevent tearing the paper or damaging the blade.

There is now an adjustable slitter shaft assembly available for 714 folders which can allow your table top machine to run a micro-perf assembly. This will work on certain 714 parallel machines starting with the “XE” in 1991. You can contact us to find out if your particular machine is capable of this upgrade.

Our friendly Parts Analysts can provide more information about these and other accessories. Contact us today!


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

The Basic Theory of Buckle Folding

BaumFolder 714XLT UltraFold

If a sheet of paper is laid on a flat surface and driven into a stationary object, a buckle or a series of buckles will form along the surface of the sheet.

Theory of Buckle FoldingIf the paper is pushed into a narrow channel before butting up against the stationary object, the buckle that forms in the channel will be a much smaller size than free-forming buckles. At the end of the channel, however, larger buckles will again start to form.

If the channel is angled to produce a down-ward pressure, and two folding rollers, spinning as indicated above, are placed close to the end of the channel, the larger buckles that start forming there will always form down-ward and be pulled into the rollers, compressing into a fold.

Roll Bank ConfigurationOn a buckle folder (like 714), the sheet comes out of the feeder flat and enters the fold plate assembly where it comes to a stop against a stationary fold stop. A series of buckles then forms through the sheet. The buckles within the fold plate are kept very small by the narrow channel design. The buckle at the end of the plate, however, will be larger. The fold plate and rollers are configured such that the large buckle will always form downward where it is grabbed by the fold rollers and compressed into a fold. The picture shows the second plate deflected. This would mean a single fold.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Envelope Printing Tips and Advice

Article Provided by OKI Data
Envelope Printing Tips

The media selected for a specific print job plays an important role in delivering high quality results. In addition to the general quality of the media (texture, weight, composition), the physical design and construction of an envelope must be taken into consideration in striving to achieve optimum print quality.

This document highlights common envelope styles and the challenges imposed. In some cases, the envelope’s composition and construction may limit the type of graphic artwork and/or the positioning of the content for that envelope style. Some envelopes should be avoided altogether.

Envelope Styles and Considerations

Examples are given for standard business envelope (Com-10) but the details covered to apply to other sizes.

Side Seams

Generally, the preferred envelope design for laser-type printing. Provides a large surface area uninterrupted with folds and seams.

Diagonal Seams

Available in a wide variety of designs and fold patterns. Economical.

Window

Window envelopes must be “laser” compatible. The clear window must be added to withstand the high temperature of the printer’s fuser. Misuse will damage the fuser.

Peal and Stick Sealing

Often includes premium quality media and good results.


This article was provided by OKI Data. For additional information and full article, please visit OKI Data online at www.okidata.com.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net