Category Archives: News & Updates

Benefits from Implementing Horizon pXnet

 

PXNET_LOGOBenefits from Implementing Horizon pXnet

The Horizon pXnet Bindery Control System is used as a central control point to schedule work, send job data to each finisher, monitor status of finishers and collect production statistics from finishers in real-time. pXnet brings efficiency and value in high-mix/low-volume production environments where frequent job changeovers are needed. The pXnet system can also be interfaced with an existing workflow for automated JDF set-up.

Benefits Include:

  • Bindery managers will see work-in-progress in real-time, to make informed decisions on scheduling, staff planning, and equipment utilization. When pXnet is integrated upstream, this data is also visible to customer service, estimating, production planning, and management.
  • pXnet uses a simple, graphical drag-and-drop system for job planning and scheduling that alerts you to potential missed deadlines, so you can balance the work or schedule additional shifts as needed.
  • All jobs are saved within pXnet, so you can easily recall recurring jobs for quick make-readies. You can also review previous jobs to answer questions or resolve problems.
  • pXnet identifies bindery bottlenecks and collects real-time shop floor data, providing accurate costing and pricing to improve your bottom line and streamline your business.
  • The pXnet system brings automation, efficiency, and accuracy to your production processes, with even greater gains when implementing a complete JDF workflow.

The Standard Horizon pXnet System integrates with various workflows to create an automated CIP4/JDF-enabled bindery. pXnet provides automatic machine setup, barcoded job tickets, the ability to save and recall recurring jobs, job record data for accounting/analysis, and the ability to monitor job status of pXnet-connected machines in real time for the ultimate in post-press effeciency. The pXnet system is available for select Standard Horizon folders, perfect binders, collators, bookletmakers and cutters.

Visit us online at www.midstatelitho.net

Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Intel Unveils New ‘Clear’ Typeface

By Jillian Wong, 10 Apr 2014
Press Release

Intel Unveils New 'Clear' TypefaceIntel has unveiled its new global typeface called ‘Intel Clear’, its first font overhaul in its 45-year history.

Designed by design agency Red Peak Branding and font studio Dalton Maag, the typeface is meant to work across all writing systems and media platforms.

The old Intel font was only available in Latin and similar-looking styles were required for other scripts, leading to inconsistency issues and multiple licensing deals. The new typeface aims to provide a unified and simplified look across multiple communication channels.

“Intel needed a brand font with personality… to be read by a five-year-old as much as by an 80-year-old, used in small, large, in print, on screen and on devices that haven’t even been invented yet,” explained Dalton Maag creative director Bruno Maag in an interview with Creative Review.

The agency worked on the project for a year, coming up with a cleaner design that exemplifies its values of openness and friendliness through rounded strokes and soft angles. “If you look at the way the lowercase ‘a’ terminates, there’s a nice feature in the bottom of the stroke, a little like calligraphy pen lettering. We wanted the characters to have a human, friendly quality,” said Maag.

One of the challenges was ensuring it looked modern across different scripts. Another issue was ensuring it was optimized for different screen sizes and resolutions, from smartphones to tablets and computers. The third concern was having characters that meet the height restrictions of bounding boxes on gadgets; characters needed to be generous and relaxed to avoid looking too cluttered on small screens.

Work is still in progress on ‘Intel Clear’ and it currently has Latin, Greek and Cyrillic scripts available.

Check out more pictures of the new typeface below. What are your thoughts on it?

 

Printing Takes Over the World

20 December 2013, Posted by David Pilcher in Print
Article Provided by FreeportPress

Printing, in all its various incarnations, has been with mankind since around 3,000 B.C., when Mesopotamians used cylinder seals to imprint onto clay tablets. Chinese and Egyptian “publishers” used stamps and blocks, while in India cloth and paper were both printed with woodblocks and plant dyes.

And while Johannes Gutenberg is generally credited as creating the first movable type printing technology in 1439, other historical sources reveal that movable type made of porcelain was likely present 400 years earlier in China.

Still, for many of us, Gutenberg represents a watershed moment for humanity, when we went from one-off manuscripts to the ability to mass produce our published materials. The resulting boom in literacy and social awareness laid the groundwork for the Renaissance and new age of access for all.

The development of print as a means to communicate with the masses, record events for posterity and explain the nature of our universe and our place in it continues to evolved, with digital printing and even 3D printing of electronic objects now possible.

This animated gif gives a nice picture of how and where printing has spread in the last 600 years. Looking at printing from this perspective, the idea that somehow digital technology has killed printing seems not only unlikely but pretty silly. It’s simply impossible to envision a world without print.


Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
www.midstatelitho.net

Baby’s life saved after 3D printed devices were implanted at U-M to restore his breathing

Article Provided by UofMHealth.org, March 17, 2014
Media Contact: Mary Masson 734-764-2220

Bioresorbable splints used for just second time ever, successfully improved breathing so baby can go home for the first time

Ann Arbor, Mich. – In his 18 months of life, Garrett Peterson has never gone home, spending his days in hospital beds tethered to ventilators that even at the highest settings couldn’t prevent his breathing from periodically stopping.

His condition was so tenuous that often his parents could not hold him for fear of compromising his breathing. But after surgeons at the University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital implanted 3D printed devices to open up Garrett’s airways, his parents are now planning to take their son home to their house in Utah for the very first time.

Hollister and Green 3D printing

Garrett is just the second person whose life was saved with a new, bioresorbable device developed at the University of Michigan by Glenn Green, M.D., associate professor of pediatric otolaryngology and Scott Hollister, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering and associate professor of surgery at U-M.

Garrett has a condition called tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve, which can put tremendous pressure on the airways. In Garrett’s case, he developed severe tracheobronchomalacia, or softening of his trachea and bronchi, and his airways collapsed to the point that they were reduced to just small slits.

The Petersons spent months watching their child stop breathing and turn blue sometimes four to five times a day – forcing medical personnel to resuscitate him with heavy medication or other interventions.

Garrett needed to be on a ventilator at pressure levels that had reached the maximum, and he was not improving. He was often on strong medication and even had been put into a medically-induced coma because he would work against the ventilator if he was awake.

“It’s really hard to watch your child basically suffocate and pass out before you could revive him and bring him back, over and over,” says Jake Peterson, Garrett’s father.

“Nothing would stop him from turning blue. Just lifting his legs for diaper change would collapse his airways and that was it. There was nothing we could do to help him,” says Natalie Peterson, Garrett’s mother.

The Petersons had read an article in May 2013 about the first baby saved by Hollister and Green’s device and believed Garrett’s case might be similar. That baby just celebrated his second birthday and continues to be free of all symptoms related to his tracheobronchomalacia.

The Petersons contacted Green at U-M.

“We thought this could be Garrett’s chance of not only getting home but also getting off a ventilator,” Natalie Peterson says.

During much of 2013, the Petersons went back and forth trying to decide if the 3D printed device was the right option. In December, Garrett’s condition took a turn for the worse. His gut was shutting down from the high ventilator pressures. He had been in an intensive care unit for over a month and was in critical condition.

The Petersons decided to come to C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

“It was highly questionable whether or not he would survive,” Green says about Garrett’s condition.

“It’s horrible not knowing when your child is going to die. It’s horrible not knowing when one of these episodes is going to be the one he doesn’t make it through.”

Hollister and Green used provisions for emergency clearance from the Food and Drug Administration to create and implant a tracheal splint for Garrett made from a biopolymer called polycaprolactone.

Hollister created a 3D model of Garrett’s airway and specially designed splints for a custom fit on the baby’s bronchi.

Hollister was able to make the custom-designed, custom-fabricated device using high-resolution imaging and computer-aided design. The device was created directly from a CT scan of Garrett’s trachea and bronchi, integrating an image-based computer model with laser-based 3D printing to produce the splint.

On Jan. 31, 2014, Richard G. Ohye, M.D., the head of pediatric cardiovascular surgery at C.S. Mott, took on the intricate task of sewing two devices on two spots of Garrett’s airway, assisted by Green. The splints were sewn around Garrett’s right and left bronchi to expand the airways and give it external support to aid proper growth. Over about three years, the splint will be reabsorbed by the body.

“There we go, up and down,” said Green as the lungs began to inflate during the surgery. “We know the splint is working, he’s able to ventilate both lungs. I’m very optimistic for him.”

As he gets strong enough to breathe on his own for the first time, Garrett is on continually decreasing ventilator support, now at less than a quarter of the pressure needed before. He’s also done short stints completely off the ventilator.

Even if he needs some ventilator support for a little while longer, it’s low enough now that he can use a home ventilator and his gut is working again

“It is a tremendous feeling to know that this device has saved another child,” says Hollister. “We believe there are many other applications for these techniques, but to see the impact living and breathing in front of you is overwhelming.”

Hollister says it is hoped that Garrett will need about two to three years for his trachea to remodel and grow into a healthy state. That’s about how long this material will take to dissolve into the body, says Hollister.

Severe tracheobronchomalacia is rare. About 1 in 2,200 babies are born with tracheobronchomalacia and most children grow out of it by age 2 or 3, although it often is misdiagnosed as asthma that doesn’t respond to treatment.

Severe cases, like Garrett’s, are about 10 percent of that number. And they are frightening, says Green. A normal cold can cause a baby to stop breathing.

“Severe tracheobronchomalacia has been a condition that has frustrated me for years,” says Green. “I’ve seen children die from it. To see this device work, for a second time, it’s a major accomplishment and offers hope for these children.”

The Petersons say they are full of hope for the future. Garrett’s smiles have returned, and they are amazed that they could be home with their baby boy in just a few months.

“We needed to give him a chance and that’s what these splints have done,” says Natalie Peterson.

“And now he’ll show us what he can do.”

About C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital: Since 1903, the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital has led the way in providing comprehensive, specialized health care for children. From leading-edge heart surgery that’s performed in the womb to complete emergency care that’s there when you need it, families from all over come to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital for our pediatric expertise. In 2013, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital was ranked eighth in the nation in Parents Magazine’s 10 Best Children’s Hospitals ranking. To learn more, go to www.mottchildren.org.
C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital provides innovative care for children with a wide variety of complex airway disorders. Learn more here: www.mottchildren.org/airwaydisorders

Creating an Ecosystem for Print Buyers

Creating an Ecosystem for Print Buyers
by Steve Barrett

In the modern world, we are bombarded by advertising. To capture the attention of the audience has become a formidable goal. Solid and consistent branding is more important than ever and the sheer volume of advertising has raised the bar to even gain someone’s attention in the first place. Print manufacturers, now more than ever, are required to be a part of the entire marketing process.

What does this mean for printers? A lot. This means that today’s marketing campaigns must be highly targeted, cross multiple mediums and they must also be vibrant enough to remain memorable. The bright side is that printers’ capabilities have blossomed over the last few years. Modern machines like the MGI Meteor DP8700XL can output highly visual printed pieces that can be tailored to their audience with variable data printing. It can also output envelopes that are a perfect match with flat work. This helps to maintain company branding.

Attention is critical. Novel approaches to advertising like bright digital-billboards and talking gas pumps have tuned our brains to overlook advertising. It’s harder than ever to awaken the brain’s reticular activation system, the section of the cortex that dictates attention. In print we have the same dynamic with our customers and printers are constantly searching for new and fun ways to snap our reader’s eyeballs onto our message. The MGI JetVarnish 3D is a prime example of this, the texture effect on print brings an otherwise flat message into our spatial reality.

Most print manufacturers are well aware of these dynamics and many have already incorporated them into their business models. Printers are no longer in the business of laying ink on paper. Instead it’s critical that we help our customer’s to develop these complex marketing campaigns and provide as many pieces of the puzzle as possible. If a print buyer needs to go anywhere else for a part of the campaign, they might just take the whole project with them.

Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
Toll Free: 1-800-343-4231
www.midstatelitho.net

Creating an Ecosystem for Print Buyers

Creating an Ecosystem for Print Buyers
by Steve Barrett

In the modern world, we are bombarded by advertising. To capture the attention of the audience has become a formidable goal. Solid and consistent branding is more important than ever and the sheer volume of advertising has raised the bar to even gain someone’s attention in the first place. Print manufacturers, now more than ever, are required to be a part of the entire marketing process.

What does this mean for printers? A lot. This means that today’s marketing campaigns must be highly targeted, cross multiple mediums and they must also be vibrant enough to remain memorable. The bright side is that printers’ capabilities have blossomed over the last few years. Modern machines like the MGI Meteor DP8700XL can output highly visual printed pieces that can be tailored to their audience with variable data printing. It can also output envelopes that are a perfect match with flat work. This helps to maintain company branding.

Attention is critical. Novel approaches to advertising like bright digital-billboards and talking gas pumps have tuned our brains to overlook advertising. It’s harder than ever to awaken the brain’s reticular activation system, the section of the cortex that dictates attention. In print we have the same dynamic with our customers and printers are constantly searching for new and fun ways to snap our reader’s eyeballs onto our message. The MGI JetVarnish 3D is a prime example of this, the texture effect on print brings an otherwise flat message into our spatial reality.

Most print manufacturers are well aware of these dynamics and many have already incorporated them into their business models. Printers are no longer in the business of laying ink on paper. Instead it’s critical that we help our customer’s to develop these complex marketing campaigns and provide as many pieces of the puzzle as possible. If a print buyer needs to go anywhere else for a part of the campaign, they might just take the whole project with them.

Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
Toll Free: 1-800-343-4231
www.midstatelitho.net

Creating an Ecosystem for Print Buyers

Creating an Ecosystem for Print Buyers
by Steve Barrett

In the modern world, we are bombarded by advertising. To capture the attention of the audience has become a formidable goal. Solid and consistent branding is more important than ever and the sheer volume of advertising has raised the bar to even gain someone’s attention in the first place. Print manufacturers, now more than ever, are required to be a part of the entire marketing process.

What does this mean for printers? A lot. This means that today’s marketing campaigns must be highly targeted, cross multiple mediums and they must also be vibrant enough to remain memorable. The bright side is that printers’ capabilities have blossomed over the last few years. Modern machines like the MGI Meteor DP8700XL can output highly visual printed pieces that can be tailored to their audience with variable data printing. It can also output envelopes that are a perfect match with flat work. This helps to maintain company branding.

Attention is critical. Novel approaches to advertising like bright digital-billboards and talking gas pumps have tuned our brains to overlook advertising. It’s harder than ever to awaken the brain’s reticular activation system, the section of the cortex that dictates attention. In print we have the same dynamic with our customers and printers are constantly searching for new and fun ways to snap our reader’s eyeballs onto our message. The MGI JetVarnish 3D is a prime example of this, the texture effect on print brings an otherwise flat message into our spatial reality.

Most print manufacturers are well aware of these dynamics and many have already incorporated them into their business models. Printers are no longer in the business of laying ink on paper. Instead it’s critical that we help our customer’s to develop these complex marketing campaigns and provide as many pieces of the puzzle as possible. If a print buyer needs to go anywhere else for a part of the campaign, they might just take the whole project with them.

Mid-State Litho, Inc.
5459 Fenton Rd.
Flint, MI 48507
Toll Free: 1-800-343-4231
www.midstatelitho.net

Pay Attention or Pay the Price

Dealer Communicator’s Seminars In Print Leasing
Pay Attention or Pay the Price
by Mary A. Redmond – Original Article Available Here

Thank goodness we’re all done with that lease negotiation. The equipment is working great. “Stick those legal mumbo jumbo contracts in the file drawer. Let’s get back to business and make money with the new equipment.” That’s often the command from the bridge by the Captain of the USS Hard Working Printer.

There’s relief when an equipment negotiation is done. Business owners think nothing more needs to be done except make the leas payments. Believe that, and experience costly surprises. Leases require customer vigilance.

Five Lease Notification Requirements

1. Insurance Proof: If the Lessee doesn’t send the Lessor an insurance binder proving the leased equipment is covered by General Liability and Physical Damage insurance, the leasing company secures the insurance for the Lessee, at a high price plus a fee.

2. Tax Exempt: Printing equipment lease payments are frequently sales and use tax exempt. State’s offer this exemption as a stimulus to encourage business to expand, add equipment and increase their employee headcount. Customers must notify the leasing company that they qualify for this tax exemption or the leasing company collects and remits the taxes to the state plus a processing fee.

3. Relocate Equipment: Request written permission to move equipment across the room or to another town. Remember, the leasing company owns the equipment.

4. Corporate Ownership Changes: Notify the Lessor at least 30-days prior to any change in the company name, headquarters location or company ownership. If this isn’t done, the lease is in default. The default paragraph is the longest and most onerous paragraph in every lease. No one wants to experience lease default penalties.

5. End of Lease Notification: Notify the leasing company of your business plans for the equipment. Don’t wait until the lease ends to give notice. This is one of the most costly requirements, when not heeded leases go into Automatic Renewal.

WARNING: Written notice options usually include the ability to purchase, return or renew the leased equipment. A Florida printer I know is trapped paying twelve extra lease payments ($12,000) because they didn’t notify the leasing company of their intent to purchase the equipment for $1.00. The lease required them to send written notice no less than 90-days and no more than 120-days before the lease ended. Stuck!

Develop a tracking system of lease notification requirements on the first day of the lease. Peace of mind will be the reward. DC


RedmondMary A. Redmond provides highly specialized information for corporations, managers and dealers who negotiate and manage leases. With 28 years in the leasing industry, including 21 working for the largest leasing companies in the U.S., Mary knows leasing. You may reach Mary at 913-422-7775 or mary@reviewyourlease.com

2013 Chapter Member of the Year
National Speakers Association – Kansas City

Seminars in Print Leasing

Dealer Communicator’s Seminars In Print Leasing
Pay Attention or Pay the Price
by Mary A. Redmond – Original Article Available Here

Thank goodness we’re all done with that lease negotiation. The equipment is working great. “Stick those legal mumbo jumbo contracts in the file drawer. Let’s get back to business and make money with the new equipment.” That’s often the command from the bridge by the Captain of the USS Hard Working Printer.

There’s relief when an equipment negotiation is done. Business owners think nothing more needs to be done except make the leas payments. Believe that, and experience costly surprises. Leases require customer vigilance.

Five Lease Notification Requirements

1. Insurance Proof: If the Lessee doesn’t send the Lessor an insurance binder proving the leased equipment is covered by General Liability and Physical Damage insurance, the leasing company secures the insurance for the Lessee, at a high price plus a fee.

2. Tax Exempt: Printing equipment lease payments are frequently sales and use tax exempt. State’s offer this exemption as a stimulus to encourage business to expand, add equipment and increase their employee headcount. Customers must notify the leasing company that they qualify for this tax exemption or the leasing company collects and remits the taxes to the state plus a processing fee.

3. Relocate Equipment: Request written permission to move equipment across the room or to another town. Remember, the leasing company owns the equipment.

4. Corporate Ownership Changes: Notify the Lessor at least 30-days prior to any change in the company name, headquarters location or company ownership. If this isn’t done, the lease is in default. The default paragraph is the longest and most onerous paragraph in every lease. No one wants to experience lease default penalties.

5. End of Lease Notification: Notify the leasing company of your business plans for the equipment. Don’t wait until the lease ends to give notice. This is one of the most costly requirements, when not heeded leases go into Automatic Renewal.

WARNING: Written notice options usually include the ability to purchase, return or renew the leased equipment. A Florida printer I know is trapped paying twelve extra lease payments ($12,000) because they didn’t notify the leasing company of their intent to purchase the equipment for $1.00. The lease required them to send written notice no less than 90-days and no more than 120-days before the lease ended. Stuck!

Develop a tracking system of lease notification requirements on the first day of the lease. Peace of mind will be the reward. DC


RedmondMary A. Redmond provides highly specialized information for corporations, managers and dealers who negotiate and manage leases. With 28 years in the leasing industry, including 21 working for the largest leasing companies in the U.S., Mary knows leasing. You may reach Mary at 913-422-7775 or mary@reviewyourlease.com

2013 Chapter Member of the Year
National Speakers Association – Kansas City

Seminars in Print Leasing

Dealer Communicator’s Seminars In Print Leasing
Pay Attention or Pay the Price
by Mary A. Redmond – Original Article Available Here

Thank goodness we’re all done with that lease negotiation. The equipment is working great. “Stick those legal mumbo jumbo contracts in the file drawer. Let’s get back to business and make money with the new equipment.” That’s often the command from the bridge by the Captain of the USS Hard Working Printer.

There’s relief when an equipment negotiation is done. Business owners think nothing more needs to be done except make the leas payments. Believe that, and experience costly surprises. Leases require customer vigilance.

Five Lease Notification Requirements

1. Insurance Proof: If the Lessee doesn’t send the Lessor an insurance binder proving the leased equipment is covered by General Liability and Physical Damage insurance, the leasing company secures the insurance for the Lessee, at a high price plus a fee.

2. Tax Exempt: Printing equipment lease payments are frequently sales and use tax exempt. State’s offer this exemption as a stimulus to encourage business to expand, add equipment and increase their employee headcount. Customers must notify the leasing company that they qualify for this tax exemption or the leasing company collects and remits the taxes to the state plus a processing fee.

3. Relocate Equipment: Request written permission to move equipment across the room or to another town. Remember, the leasing company owns the equipment.

4. Corporate Ownership Changes: Notify the Lessor at least 30-days prior to any change in the company name, headquarters location or company ownership. If this isn’t done, the lease is in default. The default paragraph is the longest and most onerous paragraph in every lease. No one wants to experience lease default penalties.

5. End of Lease Notification: Notify the leasing company of your business plans for the equipment. Don’t wait until the lease ends to give notice. This is one of the most costly requirements, when not heeded leases go into Automatic Renewal.

WARNING: Written notice options usually include the ability to purchase, return or renew the leased equipment. A Florida printer I know is trapped paying twelve extra lease payments ($12,000) because they didn’t notify the leasing company of their intent to purchase the equipment for $1.00. The lease required them to send written notice no less than 90-days and no more than 120-days before the lease ended. Stuck!

Develop a tracking system of lease notification requirements on the first day of the lease. Peace of mind will be the reward. DC


RedmondMary A. Redmond provides highly specialized information for corporations, managers and dealers who negotiate and manage leases. With 28 years in the leasing industry, including 21 working for the largest leasing companies in the U.S., Mary knows leasing. You may reach Mary at 913-422-7775 or mary@reviewyourlease.com

2013 Chapter Member of the Year
National Speakers Association – Kansas City